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Bloom – A Duo Exhibition by Ashley Yeo and Jodi Tan

When:

Tue Oct 29 2019, 10:00am–7:00pm
Wed Oct 30 2019, 10:00am–7:00pm
Thu Oct 31 2019, 10:00am–7:00pm
Fri Nov 1 2019, 10:00am–7:00pm
Sat Nov 2 2019, 11:00am–6:00pm

Where: iPreciation Gallery, 50 Cuscaden Road, HPL House #01-01, Orchard Road, Singapore

Restrictions: All ages

Ticket Information:

  • Admission: Free

Website:

Exhibition Opens to Public: 18 Oct–2 Nov 2019

iPreciation is proud to present a duo exhibition titled Bloom, featuring new works by two young Singaporean female artists, Ashley Yeo and Jodi Tan.

When one mentions the word “bloom”, flowers are the first thing that comes to minds. Flowers have always been known for their natural charms. The floral subject was widely embraced in art of different eras and has evolved in its embodiment in artworks over time. In contemporary art today, the trend of floral being used as an attractive feature or accent has not been seen dwindling. It continues to be used by artists as a source of inspiration, and a concept to work with to create artworks. Apart from being a charmer, or decorative in appearance, how else can we view a flower?

Bloom is an exhibition that hopes to present alternative perceptions and interpretations of floral in a more poetical light through the works of both Ashley and Jodi. The artworks will highlight the borrowing a flower’s presence to explore and present a new perspective on how or what a floral can be in contemporary art by having a simpler and genuine interest in florals.

Ashley takes references from botanical symmetry to create delicate paper cut structures. The lightness and fragility of these works can be related to a flower’s true fragility and impermanence. At the same time, a flower’s natural perseverance and vigour to multiply and survive can be seen within her paper cut art, where floral patterns flow seamlessly from edge to edge. It is in the accumulation of detail in her artworks, where the viewer can see strength and an underlying intensity of a message being silently conveyed.

Jodi questions the significance of a subject matter and one’s perception of it. To her, paintings of flowers have been typecast as decorative or dated, and various symbolisms have been embodied by the use of florals in both classical and ornamental paintings. Her paintings continue to blur the line between figurative and abstraction by disassociation from, or reduction of, the known symbolisms and associated meanings to florals in art. This allows viewers of her art to question—or choose—their interpretation of her floral still life paintings.